My research career started at the University of Belgrade, where I finished biochemistry studies (supervised by Prof. Vesna Niketic) and got involved in the signaling by gasotransmitters. The keen interest for this topic was the reason for staying and pursuing PhD degree at the same University. For both diploma and PhD thesis I got several national awards. After obtaining PhD, I spent three months at L’Ecole Normale Superieure, University of Paris (Prof. Christian Amatore) as a FEBS fellow, using a unique single-cell technique for detection of oxidative stress mediators. I then moved to Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg (with Prof. Ivana Ivanovic-Burmazovic), first as a postdoc and then as a habillitand in the field of biological chemistry. German habilitation system gave me an early independence and helped me start my own research aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanisms behind the intracellular redox signaling. For the habilitation work/research, I received Emmy Noether prize.

In 2015 I got a CR1 position at CNRS, ATIP Avenir grant and Idex Junior Chair grant from the University of Bordeaux, which allowed me to move and start my group at IBGC UMR5095. In 2019 I became a "directeur de recherche 2eme classe (DR2)" at CNRS and received ERC consolidator grant. I resigned from the tenured position at CNRS and moved to the Leibniz Institute for Analytical Sciences (ISAS) in Dortmund in October 2020.

My research interests are quite broad: from understanding the basic chemical steps behind intracellular metabolic pathways to regulation and treatment of different disease states. Contrary to the traditional trends, my team tends to use a multidisciplinary approach and not be specialized only in one field. This high risk/high gain tactics normally asks for the use of all available techniques (improvement of the existing and creation of the new ones) and is often achieved through collaborative work. We take a great pride in the fact that our team is “the most collaborated with” in the field.